British Army in Kenya confirms cholera outbreak common in monkeys

By , K24 Digital
On Fri, 26 Jan, 2024 10:48 | 2 mins read
Photo illustrator for cholera. PHOTO/Pexels
Photo illustrator. PHOTO/Pexels

The British Army in Kenya has confirmed a severe outbreak of cholera in Kenya with several cases reported in Nanyuki, Laikipia County.

In a statement through the Directorate of Public Communications, a unique strain of the disease, commonly found in China and linked to farmed monkeys has been reported.

"The British Army in Kenya has confirmed a severe diarrhoea outbreak. A unique parasite subtype, linked to farmed monkeys in China, has been identified. Stay informed, practice hygiene measures, and seek immediate medical attention if symptomatic," the statement read.

A screenshot of the press statement released by the Directorate of Public Communications on January 26, 2024. PHOTO/Screengrab by K24 Digital
A screenshot of the press statement released by the Directorate of Public Communications on January 26, 2024. PHOTO/Screengrab by K24 Digital

Cholera symptoms (WHO)

According to the World Health Organization, cholera is an extremely contagious illness that spreads through consuming contaminated food or water. It can result in severe and sudden watery diarrhoea, with potentially fatal consequences if not promptly treated.

Although many individuals infected with the disease may not display any symptoms, they can still excrete the bacteria in their faeces for up to 10 days, posing a risk of transmitting the infection to others.

For those who do experience symptoms, the majority typically have mild or moderate manifestations. The onset of symptoms occurs within 12 hours to five days after infection.

However, a minority of patients may suffer from acute watery diarrhoea accompanied by severe dehydration, which can be fatal if not addressed promptly.

History of Cholera

According to WHO cholera emerged in the 19th Century from its initial source in the Ganges delta in India and rapidly disseminated worldwide.

Six ensuing pandemics claimed the lives of millions across diverse continents.

The seventh pandemic was initiated in South Asia in 1961, extended to Africa by 1971, and reached the Americas in 1991.

Presently, cholera has become entrenched in numerous countries, marking it as an endemic health concern.