Why I was scared of Jowie, Maribe’s house-help tells court

By Lenox Sengre On Thu, 28 Nov, 2019 12:45 | 3 mins read
Pamela Kembo, the house-help of Jacque Maribe, told the High Court in Nairobi on Thursday that she was “scared” of Maribe’s ex-fiancé Jowie. [PHOTO | FILE]
Pamela Kembo, the house-help of Jacque Maribe, told the High Court in Nairobi on Thursday that she was “scared” of Maribe’s ex-fiancé Jowie. [PHOTO | FILE]
Editor's Review
    Pamela Kembo, the house-help of Jacque Maribe, told the High Court in Nairobi on Thursday that she was “scared” of Maribe’s ex-fiancé, Joseph Irungu, alias Jowie.

Pamela Kembo, the house-help of former Citizen Television journalist Jacque Maribe, told the High Court in Nairobi on Thursday, November 28, that she was “scared” of Maribe’s ex-fiancé, Joseph Irungu, alias Jowie, because “he used to walk around carrying a gun in the pockets of his pair of trousers”.

Kembo, who was employed by Maribe in 2016, told Justice James Wakiaga that Maribe introduced Jowie to her as a “soldier working in Dubai”.

The nanny told the court that Jowie moved in to the journalist’s house in Lang’ata in June, 2018.

“Every time, Jowie would walk around with a gun in his pocket. As a result, I was extremely scared of him,” said Kembo.

Kembo also told Justice Wakiaga that she had a feeling Jowie did not like her, at all.

“He often got angry at me, and would scold me often. At one point, he accused me of stealing money meant for house rent.”

The house-help told the court that Jowie gave neighbours a “different” narrative in regard to his profession.

“Neighbours knew that Jowie worked as a security officer at State House-Nairobi,” said Kembo.

Jowie and Maribe’s time together

The house-help also recounted to the court how Jowie and Maribe would spend their days together.

“Most times, Jowie would drive Maribe to her workplace at Citizen on Maalim Juma Road in Kilimani early in the morning, and return to the house to sleep,” said Kembo.

“On September 19, 2018 [a Wednesday], one of the two days (19 and 20) that businesswoman Monica Kimani was killed, Jowie put on a brown pair of shorts, white T-shirt, sneakers, and a cap. He, thereafter, left in Maribe’s car carrying a bag. That was 4pm.

“He did not return to the house that evening. He came back on Thursday afternoon — September 20 — and drove Maribe to work at around 4pm. He returned to the house, but left again later in the evening, this time around, wearing a grey pair of shorts.

“He returned to the house deep in the night, but I did not know until 1am Friday, September 21, when I heard him screaming in pain, and calling the name of one Brian Kasaine, a neighbour who was his friend.

“I got out of bed, and found his clothes on the doorstep of my bedroom. A few minutes later, Kasaine arrived, but told Jowie he won’t take him to hospital without him [Jowie] carrying his identity card.

“Jowie was carried out of the house, and placed on the ground. He was bleeding profusely from the shoulder at the time.

“Kasaine and Maribe, thereafter, carried Jowie into a car, and left. I did not know where the three went.

“I, thereafter, went back into the house to check if Maribe’s son was okay. In Maribe’s bedroom, I found a gun on the floor and blood spots strewn all over.”

Kembo told the court that before being employed by Maribe in 2016, she worked as a nanny for Maribe’s ex-colleague at Citizen Television, Terryanne Chebet.

“After witnessing all that scary drama, I called Terryanne Chebet, and told her that Jowie had shot himself in the shoulder, and that he had been taken to hospital. I, thereafter, went to the living room, where I stayed awake the remaining part of the night.

“Jowie, Kasaine and Maribe returned home at 4am Friday, September 21. Kasaine left for his house, whereas Jowie and Maribe locked themselves in their bedroom.”

Kembo said in the mid-morning, she removed Jowie’s clothes from her bedroom.

“Maribe’s mother arrived at the journalist’s house in mid-morning and took Maribe’s son with her. Maribe would, later 3pm, leave for work.

“Later, Jowie’s friend, Brian Kasaine, arrived and told us that he was taking Jowie back to hospital for check-up. They never returned to the house that evening. Maribe also did not come home that night.

“The following day, September 22, which was a Saturday, Maribe returned home mid-morning. Given, I was quite confused with what was going on at the time, I requested for time off duty, and went to spend the night at Terryanne Chebet’s house in Kilimani. I returned to Jacque’s house in Lan’gata the following day, September 23, a Sunday.

“On Monday, September 24, 2018, Maribe’s father brought her son back. Jowie was also brought home by Kasaine.

“On Tuesday, September 25, 2018, police officers arrived at Maribe’s house at around 6:30am. The cops went straight to her bedroom, combed the room for any evidence, and left with Jowie. That day, Maribe left for work in a taxi. I hadn’t seen her vehicle around.

“At 2pm, Jowie, in the company of police, came back to the house. The cops camped in Maribe’s house up to around 6:30pm, when they left with Jowie. Maribe’s brother, later called and told me to prepare Maribe’s son and take him to their Buruburu home. Maribe’s father also called, and told me it would be impossible for us to continue spending nights in Maribe’s house.

“So, the boy and I left for Buruburu, where we spent the night. The following day, September 26, a Wednesday, I requested Jacque Maribe’s mum to give me bus-fare so that I could travel to my rural place in Kitale, Trans-Nzoia County.

“Terryanne Chebet called and told me to ‘relax’. She asked me to go and spend over at her place in Kilimani.”

Are you a Kenyan in the diaspora with a story to tell? Do you know someone of Kenyan origin doing something remarkable in the diaspora? Do you have an opinion that you would like to share? Email us at [email protected]