Punchline is back, now on Tuesdays at 8.30 pm

By Joel Muinde On Tue, 9 Feb, 2021 11:33 | 3 mins read
Punchline K24
The new Punchline set. The show is back and will be airing on Tuesdays, from 8.30 pm. PHOTO | K24 TV

After a brief break, Kenya’s top political show is back only this time it will be on Tuesdays beginning at 8:30 pm.

The show which debuted on K24 TV in July 2019 has been the turf of many top political leaders and policymakers, all in a bid to have our audiences better informed and educated on what matters in national political affairs.

A deep reflection on the two years the show has been a staple in many Kenyan homes has driven K24 TV to make Punchline better, more inclusive, and to approach political affairs discourse differently.

The show will take a new format, that of a panel moderated by one of Kenya’s best political moderators, Debarl Inea.

Inea, an incisive and a calm personality, has nearly a decade of experience in interviewing prominent politicians and leaders on mainstream media in Kenya.

The political season is in high gear with the Building Building Bridges Initiative (BBI) referendum on top of the agenda of all key politicians whether they oppose or support it.

The Punchline panel will elucidate the public for a deeper understanding of the political direction the country is taking, including machinations and strategies being employed by the key players and their pawns.

With 18 months to go to the next General Election, the BBI referendum has taken centre stage as allies of President Uhuru Kenyatta and Orange Democratic Movement leader, Raila Odinga, criss-cross the country to drum up support for their handshake dream.

However, their journey is not without hurdles, obstacles that must be surmounted.

But what is in it for the public? What does the public need to know about what President Kenyatta and Raila Odinga do to ensure that their journey to unite the country by making constitutional amendments to end the winner-take-all politics succeeds?

With the well-rounded Punchline panel, the public will getter a better understanding of Kenya’s high octane politics.

Just yesterday, on February 8, a five-judge bench temporarily restrained the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission from conducting the BBI referendum following a petition filed by renowned economist David Ndii.

But the five judges did not stop the Assemblies or Parliament from debating the BBI proposals. With Justices Joel Ngugi, George Odunga, Jairus Ngaah, Janet Mulwa ad Enock Mwaita saying they can still intervene at the tail end of the process for pushing an amendment.

So what does that mean?

This is where we believe the public will be better informed by the rich and informative political debate that Punchline promises.

You will get all the views, varied as they are for even the law is a matter of democracy when an uneven bench sits and legal opinions voted on.

Beyond the all-important BBI politics, lies another struggle as the country’s top political leaders jostle to succeed Uhuru in 2022.

Following Deputy President William Ruto’s early campaigns for the State House job, the Jubilee Party has been left bruised and fractured with two factions emerging, dubbed Tanga Tanga and Kieleweke.

The fractious division on Monday led to the expulsion of six nominated senators from the ruling party, chief among them the vocal Isaac Mwaura and Milicent Omanga.

Political commentators say that Jubilee Senate Majority fixer, Irungu Kang’ata, is next on the chopping block after he openly and publicly antagonized his party leader with a rebellious letter in which he chided the President telling him the BBI referendum is not popular in his home turf, Murang’a County.

Such political storms need not only moderation but also expounding so that the public, who are really the most important stakeholder in political affairs, understand what is going on.

And that is the promise Punchline host, Debarl Inea, promises from today onwards.

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