Circumstances force teenage mother to breastfeed her 2-month-old sister

By Victor Mogoa On Fri, 4 Dec, 2020 11:50 | 2 mins read
Lucy Wangui lives with her daughter and five younger siblings in a one-roomed mabati house in Dandora Canaan near Korogocho Slums. [PHOTO: VICTOR MOGOA | K24 DIGITAL]
Lucy Wangui lives with her daughter and five younger siblings in a one-roomed mabati house in Dandora Canaan near Korogocho Slums. [PHOTO: VICTOR MOGOA | K24 DIGITAL]
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    Lucy Wangui, 18, a mother of 7-month-old daughter Claret Wanjiku, is one of the seven children left behind by her deceased parent.

A teenage mother-of-one from Dandora in Nairobi County has been forced to breastfeed her 2-month-old sister after her (teenager’s) mother died two weeks ago.

Lucy Wangui, 18, a mother of 7-month-old daughter Claret Wanjiku, is one of the seven children left behind by the deceased.

Wangui’s elder sibling is a 22-year-old man, Kevin Kamau, who works as a boda boda rider in Dandora.

Following the death of their mother, all the responsibilities — including house rent and food — now lie on the shoulders of the two elder siblings — Wangui and her brother Kamau.

Kamau says his daily earnings are not enough to cater for the needs of all his six siblings.

Wangui’s mother died at the Kiambu County Referral Hospital slightly over two weeks ago, leaving behind a 2-month-old baby, Beth Wanjiku, whose feeding is now the sole responsibility of Wangui.

“We got help from Dandora Canaan residents in burying mum,” said Wangui, a Class Eight drop-out.

Wangui lives with her daughter and five younger siblings, including the 2-month-old infant, in a one-roomed mabati house in Dandora Canaan near Korogocho Slums.

“I am requesting any well-wisher out there to help me feed my younger siblings. Currently, the food I get daily, is not sufficient, and, therefore, my milk production is low. As a result, I am really straining to breast-feed the babies,” she said.

According to the teenager, well-wishers and neighbours often provide them with food, though in small amounts, given most of them, who live in the slums, are also going through tough economic times due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“We supplement what we get from the well-wishers with my brother’s daily earnings,” said Wangui.

“I hope someone somewhere will be touched by my story and help in whichever way he or she can,” she added.

You can channel your help to the family through 0724026614, the contact of Wangui’s elder brother, Kevin Kamau.

“I hope to complete my studies one day, get a well-paying job and give back to the community,” said Lucy Wangui.

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